Tag Archives: Continuing

The Lowdown On Online Nursing Continuing Education

In many careers there comes a point where a person cannot advance without more education. Nursing is one of those careers. Online nursing continuing education was designed by universities to give nurses who have been working for a while a chance to further their education while maintaining their current position. Many nurses do not go into the workforce without an RN degree. But for older nurses, who did not need the training at the time, being passed over for promotions because they do not have an advanced degree is a reality. This is unfortunate, but a reality for many nurses. Getting the training needed is essential if they want to advance any further in their career.

Online nursing continuing education programs offer these nurses a chance to earn an advanced degree. Courses are arranged much like traditional classroom courses except all the work is done at home instead of a classroom. Students are expected to turn in assignments and reports on time and also complete all tests required. The degree program can take a year or more depending on how many credits a student wants to take. Once a nurse completes their training, they will be better able to compete for higher level positions and earn a better living.

By giving nurses a chance to train for better positions, online nursing continuing education is becoming more and more popular each year. Nurses who want to work in administrative or managerial roles can now get the training they will need in order to perform the job to the best of their ability. Even RN’s who want to earn a mater’s degree can do this online. Having the time to work and still enroll in classes has been a lifesaver to many. Online nursing programs are changing the way people are looking at learning and about the nursing profession.

Nursing Continuing Education Credits

According to a popular dictionary, the term ‘Credit’ means a “course unit”, that is, “a unit of study, often equivalent to an hour of class time, in a course of higher education.”

http://www.nursingworld.org, the official website of the American Nurses Association, defines a Continuing Education Credit as “A unit of measurement that describes 50 minutes of an organized learning activity, that is either didactic or clinical experience”.

There are several ways in which Credits can be earned. These include completion of regular college/in-house courses, completion of any relevant Continuing Education Courses offered by professional bodies, completion of distance learning or online course workshops and tutorials, presenting or attending course seminars, nursing-related medical presentations, and developing or teaching some course material, published papers, articles or books.

Broadly speaking, there are three types of Credits that one can earn.

The first one is known as `PLAR’ (Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition) Credit. In this, the learner’s previous workplace experience is compared to the learning requirements of a particular Continuing Education Course or program, and an assessment is made and a Credit awarded in recognition.

The Canadian Labor Force Development Board defines PLAR as a “process of identifying, assessing and recognizing what a person knows and can do for the purpose of awarding academic Credit”.

The second is `transfer’ Credit. This type of Credit award is based on some college and university courses completed already. In this, the learner’s portfolio, transcripts and referee reports are assessed before awarding a Credit. This type of Credit can compensate for part of current or intended course requirements.

The third type is the `exemption’ Credit. Here too, the assessment method is the same as in transfer Credit. But here, instead of getting a percent of Credit, the learner gets full [100%] Credit and is totally exempted from fulfilling any one course requirement.

Continuing Education agencies usually charge a non-refundable service fee for processing the application for Credit. Many of them conduct online quizzes and tests as part of their assessment before awarding Credits.

A Credit obtained is a Credit achieved!

Benefits of Continuing Education

Are you stuck in a rut at work, doing the same job year after year with little or no hope of moving up the ladder? Do you constantly wish you could switch gears midway through your career in pursuit of that dream job? Are you the idealist who believes education is a continuous process and has an undying thirst for knowledge or the realist who just wants that promotion and the consequent increase in salary?

The situations described above may be different, but the solution to all of them is one – continuing education. The term continuing education, which includes degree credit courses amongst many other types of learning activities, is generally used to refer to education that is imparted to students who are older than the traditional age of university-going students.

According to a national survey of students in continuing education, the adult learners in both two-year and four-year college degree programs were considerably older than traditional students.

Rising Numbers

In it’s latest higher education projection, the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics reported that the total enrollment of students who are 35 years or older in degree granting institutions is expected to increase 7 percent between 2005 and 2016.

One of the important reasons for continuing education could be the state of economy. According to an annual report by Sloan Consortium, a group of organizations dedicated to quality online education, bad economic times often have a good impact on education. It pushes working professionals to enhance their skills not just to retain their current jobs, but also to improve their chances of advancing as well as increase their employability.

Some of the common benefits of continuing education are:

• By enrolling in advanced or graduate degrees in their field, adults improve their chances of climbing up the corporate ladder and an increase in salary. There are certain specialized roles, such as nursing administration, which usually require professionals to obtain advanced degrees.

• Many people pursue an education to enhance their skills and position themselves favorably in the job market.

• Sometimes, continuing education becomes necessary if you want to switch careers and you don’t have the qualification, training, or experience to enter the new profession of your choice.

• Some adults pursue education because they have a hunger for learning. For them, education is a lifelong quest. Some pursue degree programs related to their professions, while others choose fields that they are interested in, which may or may not be related to their professions.

• For some, the reasons for continuing education have nothing to do with learning or earning. They look at it as something which will improve their image amongst friends and family.

• Successfully completing continuing education courses is known to have a positive impact on people’s self-esteem and quality of life.

Education may be a necessity for some and a passion for others. But the fact remains that for many, it may not be possible to give up a full-time job for continuing education. That’s where online degrees and distance learning programs are helpful – as they allow working adults to learn and earn at the same time.

A wise old man (or woman) once said that it’s never too late to go back to school. The greatest tribute to that age-old adage is being paid by the working adult population of our country that fights all odds to go back to school!

Continuing Education Is a Necessity – That Doesn’t Mean It Has to Be Tedious

Therapists who see continuing education as something just to get through are missing out. LMFTs (Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist) LPCCs (Licensed Professional Clinical Counselors) and LCSWs (Licensed Clinical Social Worker) are required to maintain current skills by completing continuing education (CEUs) requirements in order to renew their licenses.

This isn’t just a requirement, it’s an opportunity! These precious hours are time for the therapist to regroup, to recharge the batteries renew motivation, learn new skills and update established ones.

Online or Classroom teaching

Therapists can gain CEUs with self-study, online and live trainings and workshops. While it’s easy to see the appeal of online courses (convenient, on your schedule, in your jammies) “live” classes offer so much more than basic information.

Interactive learning

By attending live classes and workshops, therapists have the opportunity to discuss and get clarification, “try on” ideas with colleagues and see the material in a relatable, communicative way. Small groups are especially helpful when the opportunity to “learn it, see it, do it” is offered. This way of learning brings the material to life and offers practical and efficient ways of learning.

Meeting colleagues

Attending live classes also offers you the chance to network with colleagues while you learn together. Being a therapist can be an isolating experience, so talking with your peers, sharing ideas and community is essential. CEU classes provide an ideal opportunity to network, collaborate and educate yourself while contributing to the group as a whole.

Bring Theory to life

Live CEU workshops offer the unique opportunity to see material in action. Understanding a theory is great, knowing how to apply it is essential! As therapists learn and actually practice new skills, they contribute to the well-being of every client they see.

Don’t Put It Off

It’s easy to put off your required Continuing Education (CEU) requirements, but that leads to a rushed experience as your renewal date looms. Help yourself and your practice by getting those CEU dates on your calendar now. While there are legal minimum required hours, there is no maximum to the amount of learning from which a therapist can benefit. You don’t give the “bare minimum” to your clients, why settle for it in your CEUs?

Get motivated

Live classes allow you to be part of a bigger community that will support your work, motivate you to be stretch and that needs your contribution of energy. Online IS convenient, but it’s also one more place of isolation, and often, frustration. Get out of your jammies, go see your colleagues, and get excited about your meaningful and challenging work again!

Registered Nursing Continuing Education

The completion of two to four years of education, with an associate degree or a baccalaureate degree, is a basic requirement to become a Registered Nurse. The field of nursing is wide open, because of a shotage of muc needed nurses in hospitals and other venues across the country and the world.

There are many types of courses and providers available. The common goal of these courses is to prepare the future nurses for initial entry into practice and RN licensure [procedure of which differs from state to state in the US] and work their way up the professional ladder.

The candidates should complete a minimum number of hours of CE courses to qualify for licensure. They are also expected to pass the NCLEX-RN® examination. This examination measures the competencies needed to practice nursing safely and effectively as a newly licensed entry-level RN. NCLEX-RN® is used by Boards of Nursing all over the US and its territories.

If a nursing aspirant had her education abroad, she has to take the RNCGFNS, which provides a certification platform and includes a test of English proficiency, and an examination designed to prepare for the NCLEX-RN® examination. The CGFNS certificate program, which is only available for RN candidates, is well-established and serves as a requirement by 42 Boards of Nursing.

The Florida Nurses Association says in the home page of its official website http://www.floridanurse.org, ‘Nursing is not a job. It is a profession requiring specialized knowledge and skills’. A Continuing Education program is the best way to acquire this.

The Importance of Dental Continuing Education

The pursuit of lifelong learning-whether to enrich our lives, follow a new dream, or simply challenge ourselves, is certainly something that appeals to many of us. For some professionals, however, ongoing training in their fields of expertise is more important than for others. Individuals working in the medical and dental fields are entrusted with the safety and comfort of others on a daily basis. Should they choose to rely upon their initial training indefinitely, ignoring ongoing developments and technological advances, they would be putting their practices at legal risk and jeopardizing the health and welfare of their patients. In these fields, it’s simply not an option to assume that there is nothing more to learn.

Dental continuing education is essential for anyone working within the dental field. As in the medical field, technological advances in the field come at a rapid-fire pace, and staying abreast of the latest research, tools and treatment methods is crucial. Ongoing training for dental professionals is so important that most states require that dentists and hygienists complete a certain number of dental continuing education activities each year in order to remain licensed to practice. These requirements vary from state to state, and in some cases also apply to dental assistants.

Pursuing continued education in the dental field can be beneficial in several ways. For a dentist who is currently in practice, ongoing continuing education ensures that his or her patients have access to the latest diagnostic, preventative and treatment methods. For an individual just beginning a career in the dental field, dental continuing education can open new career pathways, provide opportunities for advancement and improve earning power.

A wide variety of dental continuing education activities are available for both working and non-working individuals. If your goal is simply to stay informed about new research findings and updated industry best practices, there are plenty of low-cost, self-paced online courses that can help you to meet your state’s continuing education requirements and enhance your ability to perform your current job role. If you are interested in furthering your formal education, however, in order to advance your career in the dental field, you may wish to pursue a degree or certificate program. For example, a dental assistant may discover that she is interested in pursuing a career as a hygienist-whether to earn a higher salary or simply to experience more personal fulfillment in her job role. In this case, she would need a degree from an accredited dental hygiene school in order to obtain her license.

Regardless of the pathway you choose, as a dental professional you should consider your pursuit of education to be a lifelong endeavor. Doing so will not only better position you to advance within your chosen field; it will also ensure that you’re able to provide the best possible care for your patients.