Category Archives: Education News

The Lowdown On Online Nursing Continuing Education

In many careers there comes a point where a person cannot advance without more education. Nursing is one of those careers. Online nursing continuing education was designed by universities to give nurses who have been working for a while a chance to further their education while maintaining their current position. Many nurses do not go into the workforce without an RN degree. But for older nurses, who did not need the training at the time, being passed over for promotions because they do not have an advanced degree is a reality. This is unfortunate, but a reality for many nurses. Getting the training needed is essential if they want to advance any further in their career.

Online nursing continuing education programs offer these nurses a chance to earn an advanced degree. Courses are arranged much like traditional classroom courses except all the work is done at home instead of a classroom. Students are expected to turn in assignments and reports on time and also complete all tests required. The degree program can take a year or more depending on how many credits a student wants to take. Once a nurse completes their training, they will be better able to compete for higher level positions and earn a better living.

By giving nurses a chance to train for better positions, online nursing continuing education is becoming more and more popular each year. Nurses who want to work in administrative or managerial roles can now get the training they will need in order to perform the job to the best of their ability. Even RN’s who want to earn a mater’s degree can do this online. Having the time to work and still enroll in classes has been a lifesaver to many. Online nursing programs are changing the way people are looking at learning and about the nursing profession.

Nursing Continuing Education Credits

According to a popular dictionary, the term ‘Credit’ means a “course unit”, that is, “a unit of study, often equivalent to an hour of class time, in a course of higher education.”

http://www.nursingworld.org, the official website of the American Nurses Association, defines a Continuing Education Credit as “A unit of measurement that describes 50 minutes of an organized learning activity, that is either didactic or clinical experience”.

There are several ways in which Credits can be earned. These include completion of regular college/in-house courses, completion of any relevant Continuing Education Courses offered by professional bodies, completion of distance learning or online course workshops and tutorials, presenting or attending course seminars, nursing-related medical presentations, and developing or teaching some course material, published papers, articles or books.

Broadly speaking, there are three types of Credits that one can earn.

The first one is known as `PLAR’ (Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition) Credit. In this, the learner’s previous workplace experience is compared to the learning requirements of a particular Continuing Education Course or program, and an assessment is made and a Credit awarded in recognition.

The Canadian Labor Force Development Board defines PLAR as a “process of identifying, assessing and recognizing what a person knows and can do for the purpose of awarding academic Credit”.

The second is `transfer’ Credit. This type of Credit award is based on some college and university courses completed already. In this, the learner’s portfolio, transcripts and referee reports are assessed before awarding a Credit. This type of Credit can compensate for part of current or intended course requirements.

The third type is the `exemption’ Credit. Here too, the assessment method is the same as in transfer Credit. But here, instead of getting a percent of Credit, the learner gets full [100%] Credit and is totally exempted from fulfilling any one course requirement.

Continuing Education agencies usually charge a non-refundable service fee for processing the application for Credit. Many of them conduct online quizzes and tests as part of their assessment before awarding Credits.

A Credit obtained is a Credit achieved!

Online Education Courses Learn to Do Anything

Online education courses are a great way to learn many things. With the sheer number of people today who have regular access to the Internet, the opportunities to learn these things are far greater than they were just a decade or two ago. Without online education, the only way to learn a new skill or take a class would be to physically attend that class or find someone who could teach you privately. Because of the technology of online education, there are literally thousands of things you can learn and many of them can be studied right from the privacy of your own home.

In many cases, the fact that you are learning from home can be a real benefit. Consider the privacy you have in your home. If you are learning something new, there’s no need for others to even know you are studying this particular subject. You may be embarrassed to let others know that you don’t already have this knowledge, or it might simply be in your best interest that others don’t know. For example, you may be seeking to gain a training certificate that will put you in line for a promotion. It might be politically incorrect in your current employment to be making this move. Your current supervisor might resent the fact that you want to move up. While secrecy is never a good thing, being discreet about your plans might be a wise move. You may even be looking for employment elsewhere and taking online education courses may be a stepping stone to that move. Again, letting your current employer know about your educational goals could be cause for tension in your current work environment.

It could also be that you just want to learn something new. You’ll find literally hundreds of online education courses available. Whether you’re wanting to learn to sew or you want to work on a degree, you can likely find an online education program that’s just right for you.

Montessori Education – What Are The Benefits?

Choosing an education system or a method for your child is something only you can do and Montessori education is one of the major options you have. This educational approach was developed by Maria Montessori an Italian educator and physician and it emphasizes more on freedom, independence and respect for the social, physical and psychological development of the child. This education system is becoming very popular across the globe probably because of the many advantages it has over other educational approaches.

1. The education focuses on the developmental stages of the children falling in the age group of 3 and 5 to hone language skills, motor skills and completion of important daily activities such as arts and crafts, cooking and dressing among others. It is therefore one of the best systems you can choose for your preschooler to instill a degree of independence and confidence in them.

2. It encourages cooperative play so they get a chance to explore the different learning stations within the classroom. It therefore puts them in the best position to work together, respect each other and build on the sense of community which is very important even in later life.

3. Preschoolers who get this educational approach have the advantage of enjoying learning that is child centered. It means that they will be handled depending on their specific abilities and needs so they get to learn and explore at a pace that suits them best. Every child is given an equal chance to develop at their own pace; hence no one is left out at the end of the day.

4. This system helps children learn self-discipline in the most natural way possible. They work alongside each other and follow rules refining different skills, including self-control, motivation and concentration. It is also a system of education that teaches order which is very important in bringing up responsible children.

5. Montessori education also inspires creativity in the children because they work under their own terms where creativity is highly encouraged. They tend to focus more on the process than the end result of the activities they get involved in and this broadens the thinking on how to address the concept in the best ways possible.

6. It offers hands-on learning to the children to make learning fun and easily understandable to them. There are so many activities that are engaged in the learning to that practical life, culture, math and language lessons are learned by the kids. They get to master the most important life skills as well, besides having an easier understanding of harder areas such as subtractions and additions.

Preschools and schools offering a Montessori system have become very popular today because parents have seen the great value offered by the approach that they get. It is a system that can actually be very helpful in developing a number of skills in children from an early age preparing them for other levels of education and sharpening their growing minds to make them better students.

Is the Carrot and Stick Method Useful in Higher Education?

Consider how the process of learning begins for students. As a general perceptual rule, when students begin their degree programs they hope to obtain good grades, useful skills, and relevant knowledge. The tuition paid assures placement in a class and there are implied results that students expect as a product of their involvement in that class. In contrast, instructors expect that students will obey the academic rules, perform to the best of their abilities, and comply with specific class requirements that include deadlines for completion of learning activities.

For students, grades serve as an indicator of their progress in class, a symbol of their accomplishments and failures, and a record of their standing in a degree program. I have heard many students state that their primary goal for the class was to earn what they refer to as “good grades” – even though they may not be fully aware of what constitutes a good grade for them. When students aren’t achieving good grades, or the minimum expected by instructors and/or the school, instructors may try to nudge them on – either through positive motivational methods such as coaching and mentoring, or negative motivational methods that include threats and a demeaning disposition.

I found that many educators dangle a carrot in front of their students through indirect methods, such as the potential to earn a better grade, as an “A” in an indicator of the ultimate achievement in school. There may be incentives given to prompt better performance, including additional time or a resubmission allowance for a written assignment, as a means of encouraging students to perform better.

My question is whether the focus of teaching in higher education should be on the carrot we dangle in front of students to perform better or should there be more of a focus on what motivates each individual student to perform to the best of their abilities? In other words, do we need to be dangling something in front of students to serve as a source of motivation?

What is the Carrot and Stick Method?

I believe that most people understand the meaning of dangling a carrot in front of students to motivate them. The phrase is actually based upon a tale about a method of motivating a donkey and while the carrot is dangling in front of it, the stick is used to prod the animal along. The carrot serves as a reward and the stick is used as a form of reinforcement and punishment for non-compliance.

This approach is still used in the workplace, even subconsciously by managers, as a method of motivating employees. The carrot or incentives may include a promotion, pay increase, different assignments, and the list continues. The stick that is used, or the punishment for not reaching specific goals or performance levels, may include demotion or a job loss. A threat of that nature can serve as a powerful motivator, even if the essence of this approach is negative and stressful.

The Carrot and Stick Approach in Higher Education

If you are uncertain about the use of this approach in higher education, consider the following example. You are providing feedback for a written assignment and it is now the halfway point in the class. For one particular student, you believe they have not met the criteria for the assignment and more importantly, they have either not put in enough effort, they did not perform to your expectations, or they did not live up to their full potential.

It is worth mentioning that your beliefs about students are shaped by how you view them and their potential. In other words, I try to see my students as individuals who have varying levels of performance and that means some will be further along than others. In contrast, instructors who believe they do not have enough time to get to know their students as individuals may view the class as a whole and set an expectation regarding the overall performance level that all students should be at for this particular point in the class.

Returning to the example provided, my question to you is this: Do you reward the attempt made by the student or do you penalize that student for what you perceive to be a lack of effort? As a faculty trainer, I have interacted with many faculty who believe that all students should be high performers and earning top grades, regardless of their background and prior classes. When students fail to meet that expectation, there is a perception that students either do not care, they are not trying, or they are not reading and applying the feedback provided. The instructor’s response then is to dangle a carrot (incentive) and use the stick to try to change the necessary student behaviors.

Relevance for Adult Learning

There is a perception held by many educators, especially those who teach in traditional college classes, that the instructors are in control and students must comply. This reinforces a belief within students that they do not have control over their outcomes and that is why many believe grades are beyond their control. I have seen many students stop trying by the time they were enrolled in a class I was teaching simply because they could not make a connection between the effort they have made to the outcomes or grades received. In other words, while they believed they were doing everything “right” – they were still getting poor grades.

At the heart of the adult learning process is motivation. There are as many degrees of motivation as there are types of students and it is not realistic to expect that all students will be performing at the same level. I’ve learned through time and practice that adult student behaviors do not or will not permanently change as a result of forced compliance. However, behaviors will change in time when an instructor has built a connection with their students and established a sense of rapport with them. I encourage instructors to think beyond dangling a carrot and try to influence behavior, and not always through the use of rewards.

From a Carrot to a Connection

It is important for instructors to create a climate and classroom conditions that are conducive to engaging students, while becoming aware of (and recognizing) that all students have a capacity to learn and some gradually reach their potential while others develop much more quickly. My instructional approach has shifted early on from a rewards or carrot focus to a student focus. I want to build connections with students and nurture productive relationships with them, even when I am teaching an online class and have the distance factor to consider. I encourage students to make an effort and I welcome creative risks. I teach students to embrace what they call their failures as valuable learning lessons. I encourage their involvement in the learning process, prompt their original thinking during class discussions, and I teach them that their efforts do influence the outcomes received.

I recognize that this type of approach is not always easy to implement when classroom management is time consuming, and this is especially true for adjunct instructors. However, at a very minimum it can become an attitude and part of an engaging instructional practice. I encourage instructors to include it as part of their underlying teaching philosophy so they recognize and work to implement it. Every educator should have a well-thought out teaching philosophy as it guides how they act and react to students and classroom conditions. A student focus, rather than a carrot and stick focus, creates a shift in perspective from looking first at the deficits of students and seeing their strengths – along with their potential. It is an attitude of looking away from lack and looking towards meaning in the learning process, and a shift from seeing an entire class to viewing students individually. My hope is that this inspires you to re-evaluate and re-examine how teach your students and consider new methods of prompting their best performance.

Education Without Exams

The question is this: would education without exams be better for students? Why should exams be taken? what does an exam do? Many people believe it is a way, which can help the students to improve their skills or just a mechanism that makes student progress for their successful future. For a student, exams are an inescapable part of his or her school time. Since there is the presence of an education system, exams can be used as a means of study assessment.

However, nowadays, more and more people have come to the decision that exams are not the only means of study assessment, they believe that education without exams would be better for the student. Most students cannot master technology, what have they got? What first needs to be done by students is to understand the aims of studying, is it to improve skills or pass exams. We do not need to be an educationist to answer this question, to improve a skill is the reason why most people study. Taking this idea into account, the exam has many disadvantages and deficiencies for the student.

Firstly, formal exams cannot appear to reflect a student’s ability accurately; it can be unfair in several ways. For example, the whole career of a student depends upon what he or she does on a certain day and hours of an exam. if the student is ill, or if he or she has had some emotional trauma, these factors could have a negative effect on the student’s exam results. Some students do not perform well under pressure and require a longer time to reach useful conclusions.

The final marks need to be decided by all items including assessment work, attendance, presentation, group work and examinations. All these can really reflect student’s ability after their subject not only exam. If someone did not have a good revision or did some mistake in the examination, he or she definitely can fail him or her examination, but he or she still have done efforts in his or her study, so now the other item will be used to consider student’s marks.

In different countries, there are different educational system, but they affirm having the same final process which is an examination. So the argument is coming from the final examination whether can identify student’s efforts and abilities. Though formal exams have been used in the past, they should no longer be used as the only means of assessment because they can be an unfair indication of the student’s overall ability, exams are important but to test in other ways as well are better for the students, which can be easy to test student’s abilities.

WHAT DO WE WANT FROM EXAM ASSESSMENT?

Good assessment programs aim to provide a balanced, fair evaluation of each student. It can be achieved in two ways. First, the use of a variety of strategies and tasks which gives the students multiple opportunities, in varying contexts, to demonstrate what they know and can do. It also enables teachers to be confident in the accuracy of their judgments about each student.

Second, tasks must be fit for purpose. Let assume a subject has a number of goals (knowledge to learn, skills to acquire), each task should be appropriate to the specific goal or goals it is assessing. This means that a task assessing base knowledge will look different to one assessing creativity. Rather than abolishing exams, we should instead be asking what mix of assessment task is most appropriate for each subject.

EXAMS FOCUS ON THE BREADTH

In most disciplines, there are specific bodies of knowledge that students are expected to learn. Physics students might learn about thermodynamics, while history students might learn about cold war. Thus, exams enable us to accurately test student’s breadth of understanding of these topics.

Critics of exams often instead promote deep, rich, and authentic assessment tasks. These are typically project-based tasks that draw on student’s creativity and interest. For example, history students might be asked to choose and research historical character in depth. Business studies might be asked to design the pitch for a new business seeking venture capital.

These tasks develop several important higher order thinking skills, such as analysis and decision -making. However, they are not alternatives to exams. They do different things. And this is exactly what we want: multiple, different tasks to maximize student’s opportunities to demonstrate what they know and can do.

Finally, we also want fit-for-purpose, where the breadth of knowledge is important, we want assessment tasks that target this breath. We want our future doctors to know of the entire human body. We want our future teachers to know a full repertoire of teaching and learning approaches.

Higher Education Must Rise to the Challenges and Opportunities Presented by COVID-19

One thing that we have all begun to appreciate since the arrival of the Corona-virus Pandemic has been the importance of scientists and those that support them. It is clear to the world that until there is a vaccine there is no real chance of bringing the situation under control. Governments have endeavored to wrestle with the need to minimize risk and deaths, and social distancing has become a key aspect of those efforts. Progress is being made, but it is often fitful and patchy, and there is always the ever present danger of further peaks of infection if we ease up too quickly, or simply resume life as it used to be before the arrival of COVID-19. The reality is that the ways of behavior, of interaction and doing business need to change and already there are signs of a new normal emerging, one that is predicated on the need to be cautious, vigilant and aware of the fact that anyone can catch the disease, and that anyone can spread it. Yet for all that, there is a pressing need to try and return to some form of normality, mindful of the fact that the disease remains a very real danger.

One sector that has found itself severely disrupted by the Corona-virus has been that of higher education. Universities and colleges have been closed, academic and support staff left in fear for their futures, and students’ studies interrupted, and exams cancelled or postponed indefinitely. It is as if the pause button has been pressed on the entire sector, and yet this is the very sector that provides those scientists and others that will tackle future crises. Looking at the higher education sector it soon becomes apparent that the current paralysis need not exist, with a little imagination, and some technical know-how learning can continue. Granted the traditional face to face teaching that we have all been used to cannot go ahead at present, but various technological platforms mean that academics and students can interact in a controlled and professional manner. Already hundreds of institutions around the world have realized that they can justify their existence by conducting online teaching, with staff finding the process something of a revelation. Naturally, there have been a few technical glitches and teething problems, but once these have been ironed out all concerned seem to feel that the process is beneficial and what is more know that learning is being maintained and advanced.

So, what are the challenges for such a process in Bangladesh? Well, one of the greatest hurdles to surmount is the psychological one in respect of resistance to change. Some academics and many members of leadership and management teams are not particularly tech savvy and do not entirely grasp how online learning platforms might work. There are understandable anxieties about the need for training, and the development and availability of suitable learning resources. Such processes require total commitment, and that means that staff think through what material is made available and how lessons or units develop along with the learning objectives and assessment tasks. Many staff have little or no experience of such learning and so fear being exposed by such a process. Everyone needs to engage in some heuristic learning – learning by doing, and overtime ambivalence or hostility to such learning evaporates, and it can often be found to be a iterating experience. What is more institutions are finding that they can develop units and courses that can be easily offered to students who for whatever reason actually prefer distance learning. With planning and the appropriate monitoring and checks and balances, and of course safeguards around privacy etc. there is potential to tap into a way of learning that is undergoing exponential growth across much of the world.

For such learning to be effective in Bangladesh it is paramount that all students have access to the learning platforms, and this might well mean that tablets and other devices become a standard learning tool, one that is issued to all students and if necessary built into the fee structure. Rather than viewing such technology as a cost, it is needs to be seen as an asset, one that helps facilitate and optimize learning. It is vital that internet connectivity is improved and consolidated, something that is integral to the national economy. So, with this in mind, there are some questions that need to be asked of each and every HE institution:

1) What learning is available online?

2) What plans are afoot to develop online learning?

3) How often are staff given training to support the introduction of online teaching?

4) What funds have been budgeted for the development of online learning? If not, why not?

5) What is being done to ensure that all students can access the online learning platform?

6) What lessons are being learnt from what is being done internationally?

7) Who are the Online Learning change-makers in the institution, and are they being adequately supported?

8) What are the chief concerns about online learning and how might these be addressed?

9) Are various stakeholders being consulted in order ensure that the system works efficiently and effectively?

10) What mechanisms are in place to protect IT systems from viruses and hackers?

11) Could time and resources be saved by holding more meetings via online meeting platforms?

12) How is online learning being recognized and celebrated?

There are very real opportunities at the present time to innovate, not just for the time of the Pandemic, but for the future. The most forward-thinking institutions have already recognized that this is a golden opportunity to embrace positive chance, to ensure the sector is both relevant and dynamic. No one is saying that it is easy, but it certainly can be exciting. When people embrace change and are helped to adapt to it remarkable things happen. Now is the time to harness the country’s considerable IT talent to ensure that it becomes trans formative in the field of higher education and beyond. Quietly and relentlessly a revolution is taking place, one that will broaden all our horizons about what learning and indeed the world of work can become. Looking further afield we will notice that resistance is futile, change is already happening, it is just that the situation arising from the Corona-virus has speeded things up. No one should be in any doubt that there will be challenges, but the simple fact is that these are far outweighed by the opportunities.

Benefits of Continuing Education

Are you stuck in a rut at work, doing the same job year after year with little or no hope of moving up the ladder? Do you constantly wish you could switch gears midway through your career in pursuit of that dream job? Are you the idealist who believes education is a continuous process and has an undying thirst for knowledge or the realist who just wants that promotion and the consequent increase in salary?

The situations described above may be different, but the solution to all of them is one – continuing education. The term continuing education, which includes degree credit courses amongst many other types of learning activities, is generally used to refer to education that is imparted to students who are older than the traditional age of university-going students.

According to a national survey of students in continuing education, the adult learners in both two-year and four-year college degree programs were considerably older than traditional students.

Rising Numbers

In it’s latest higher education projection, the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics reported that the total enrollment of students who are 35 years or older in degree granting institutions is expected to increase 7 percent between 2005 and 2016.

One of the important reasons for continuing education could be the state of economy. According to an annual report by Sloan Consortium, a group of organizations dedicated to quality online education, bad economic times often have a good impact on education. It pushes working professionals to enhance their skills not just to retain their current jobs, but also to improve their chances of advancing as well as increase their employability.

Some of the common benefits of continuing education are:

• By enrolling in advanced or graduate degrees in their field, adults improve their chances of climbing up the corporate ladder and an increase in salary. There are certain specialized roles, such as nursing administration, which usually require professionals to obtain advanced degrees.

• Many people pursue an education to enhance their skills and position themselves favorably in the job market.

• Sometimes, continuing education becomes necessary if you want to switch careers and you don’t have the qualification, training, or experience to enter the new profession of your choice.

• Some adults pursue education because they have a hunger for learning. For them, education is a lifelong quest. Some pursue degree programs related to their professions, while others choose fields that they are interested in, which may or may not be related to their professions.

• For some, the reasons for continuing education have nothing to do with learning or earning. They look at it as something which will improve their image amongst friends and family.

• Successfully completing continuing education courses is known to have a positive impact on people’s self-esteem and quality of life.

Education may be a necessity for some and a passion for others. But the fact remains that for many, it may not be possible to give up a full-time job for continuing education. That’s where online degrees and distance learning programs are helpful – as they allow working adults to learn and earn at the same time.

A wise old man (or woman) once said that it’s never too late to go back to school. The greatest tribute to that age-old adage is being paid by the working adult population of our country that fights all odds to go back to school!

Why Use Socratic Seminars in Your Health Education Class?

What is a Socratic seminar? A Socratic seminar is a formal discussion based on a topic where the leader asks open-ended questions. Throughout the Socratic seminar students will listen closely to the comments of others, think critically, and articulate their own thoughts and their responses to the thoughts of their peers. Students will learn to work cooperatively and ask questions intelligently and civilly. The Socratic seminar allows students to apply practical methods of a topic being discussed and enables the students to view certain points from several different perspectives. Throughout the discussion the teacher should minimally intervene, and when doing so it should be to lead the students to a specific topic or ask an additional open-ended question about a topic already being discussed. Giving the students the freedom to participate in a Socratic discussion will increase student involvement and student learning.

A Socratic discussion can be utilized in any subject including history, language arts, sociology, etc. but I would like to discuss the use of a Socratic discussion in a health education class. Incorporating a Socratic seminar in your health education class will be prevalent in most topics such as living a healthy life, building good character, physical activity, nutrition and health, managing stress, emotional problems, relationships, obesity, drug use, environmental health etc. this is because these topics are very relevant to your students everyday life. You can lead your students into a discussion with these topics with a current event article, after a discussion lecture, after watching a you tube clip, and relating it to something that may be going on or happening in your school. In addition these are all topics that I’m sure your students have interest in, hear about, and participate in on an everyday basis. With a proper questioning technique by the leader (teacher) you will be able to generate a very scholarly discussion among your students, you may be surprised how passionate some of your students are about specific topics.

The key to getting your students to participate and really get involved is to ask the right questions that will generate discussion. Once you are on a specific topic in class begin a Socratic seminar by asking a question on that topic, once a few students have responded start asking questions such as what do you mean by that? How does this relate? Could you give me an example? Could you explain further, what is he/she assuming? Why do you think that right? What lead you to that believe? What’s an alternative? Are you implying this? Etc. Again you may be shocked how some students may passionately agree with some of their peers responses and comments, or disagree and begin to debate which may be a good learning experience for the students because they will begin to view the topic/discussion from multiple perspectives which may enhance the learning experience.

The purpose of a Socratic seminar is to get your students engaged in a higher level of thinking to promote learning. Incorporating Socratic seminars into your class will lead your students in discussion, debate, critical thinking, acquiring greater interests, and the ability to apply practical methods. “He who learns but does not think is lost” Confucius (551-479 BCE).

Special Education Programs Meeting Student Needs in Nassau County

Children’s Readiness Center

Student Disability: Significant developmental delays including autism, and mental retardation

Student Age: 5 to 8 (Early Elementary)

Students who attend this state-of-the-art early education center in Long Island need a highly individualized behavioral approach and small class size (6:1:2). As part of its educational/behavioral approach, the program’s specially trained staff track results of each student’s activities in continuous documentation. Long Island school program goals include not only developing the youngsters’ communication skills and increasing their social interactions but also accomplishing individualized educational goals in preacademic and academic programs. Parents and family at this Long Island school learn behavioral and educational strategies that can be used with the children at home.

Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) is the teaching methodology used throughout the program. Skills are broken down into small steps and various teaching techniques are used to ensure skill mastery under a variety of conditions. This Long Island School uses a progressive total communication system that may include spoken words, photographs, pictures, symbols and/ or sign language, to increase communication skills. The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) method involves the child initiating a social exchange to make requests or communicate.

Carman Road Preschool

Student Disability: Preschooler with a disability (multiple disabilities, physical disabilities)

Student Age: 3 to 5

The Preschool Program at Carman Road School is one of many Long Island schools that provide total educational intervention for children with multiple, physical and cognitive disabilities in a specially designed environment. All children at this Long Island school are encouraged to reach their greatest potential through many activities that stimulate growth and development while building self-confidence. Youngsters are referred to the program by their local district Committee on Preschool Education (CPSE). Once accepted, they attend full-day classes, five days a week, entering an educational environment that promotes the greatest possible achievement.

The total child perspective at this Long Island school is used to address the needs of each youngster on an individual basis. The curriculum stresses the development of physical skills and the growth of cognitive, social, emotional and language skills. Each child’s unique abilities and needs are considered in all the program’s activities.

An Engineered Aided Language Environment, using visual strategies and assistive technology, are used to encourage physical development and the growth of communication skills for children attending this Long Island school. For each child, a multidisciplinary team develops strategies and methods to meet the goals and objectives of his/her Individualized Education Plan (IEP). Children receive physical, occupational, and speech therapies as prescribed in their IEPs. Time is spent each day encouraging the growth of skills needed in activities of daily living, such as feeding and dressing. Social skills are developed in structured activities and free play. This Long Island school uses individual and group projects such as painting, cooking, coloring, planting flowers, water play and using the sand table develop motor and learning skills. The children work with specially trained teachers in the Learning Center where they begin to use assistive technology, adapted computers, specialized software, touch screens and switches. Access to the Adapted Physical Education provides opportunities for additional growth in motor skills for children attending this Long Island school.

Parents can visit their child’s classroom and observe the program. They can also talk with the classroom teacher and with members of the multidisciplinary team on these visits and throughout the year as necessary. Parents also participate in the development of the child’s IEP. Parent Teacher Association (PTA) meetings at this Long Island school cover topics that are important to education and management of children with special needs and are held monthly.